Tagged: Dentistry

No Dentistry Nobel Laureate

UPDATE below.

When I was approached by the Nobel Committee at Sweden’s Karolinska Institute in October last year, probably as having been recognized as “[h]older of [an] established post as full Professor[s] at the faculties of medicine in Sweden [or] holder[s] of similar post[s] at the faculties of medicine or similar institutions in Denmark, Finland, Iceland and Norway”; and invited to nominate a possible candidate for the Physiology and Medicine award 2017, I was wondering whether there would be a dentist who might deserve the honor.

According to Alfred Nobel’s (1833-1896) will,

[t]he said interest shall be divided into five equal parts, which shall be apportioned as follows: /- – -/ one part to the person who shall have made the most important discovery within the domain of physiology or medicine …

Well, I checked out most prolific and highly cited dentistry professionals (of course with a focus on Perio), made myself aware of previous years’ laureates, and immediately noticed there was none. Dentistry has made advances in the past hundred years or so, no doubt. But, when considering Perio (my field of interest), it might in fact be questioned whether our understanding of the pathogenesis of periodontal diseases has witnessed fundamental breakthroughs after, say, the late 1970s. Whether basic principles of treatment have changed. As a matter of fact, innovations, such as regenerative treatment, had no lasting effect as respective methods may be applied in a minority of lesions, i.e. deep infrabony lesions and a few furcation involvements only. And the main issues, prevention and treatment of more aggressive forms, seem to be yet unresolved. What appears to thrill both young and old dentists right now is a one-hundred-year-old claim of focal infection, the so-called Perio-Systemic link.

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