Tagged: Mariano Sanz

3D Animation on Oral and General Health Open Access

 

Atheroma

Screenshot of a scene in the movie showing an atheroma in a blood vessel. A bacterial cell with fimbriae, minutes before designated “such as Porphyromonas gingivalis”, seems to be attached to an endothelial cell. Another is visible in the blurred back, attached to the breaking-up atheroma

In a previous post, I have expressed considerable concern about an assumed advertorial in our leading periodontal journal, JCP. Quintessence Publishing was about to launch their fourth installment of “3D” animated, short (each 15-17 min) movies all called Cell-to-Cell Communication, “Oral Health and General Health – The Links between Periodontitis, Atherosclerosis, and Diabetes.” Previous movies have been offered for purchase by QuintPub for  a remarkable amount of around $100. Luckily, the new one can now be found on the EFP homepage and accessed by members and non-members for free.

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Visions, Illusions, Animations

It is remarkable that the prestigious Journal of Clinical Periodontology, founded by Hans Mühlemann and edited for decades by Jan Lindhe, is going to publish a commercial for a Quintessence Publishing and Sunstar production, part of a Quintpub series of DVDs (all called Cell-to-Cell Communication) of short (each runs for about 15 minutes) animated (“3D”) movies. The first installations in this series had been about inflammatory reactions in the periodontium (I had critically reported on its educational value here), periodontal regeneration and osseointegration.

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Primary Prevention of Periodontal Disease

On November 9, EFP leaders had live-streamed a webinar in which their guidelines were provided based on conclusions drawn from the 2014 EFP workshop in Segovia, Spain. The 11th European workshop was by and large about prevention, and extensive systematic reviews and position papers had been published earlier this year in the Journal of Clinical Periodontology. A video of the webinar can be seen here.

The panel comprising Professors Mariano Sanz, Maurizio Tonetti, Iain Chapple and Søren Jepsen had an emphasis on primary prevention in subjects without periodontal or peri-implant diseases, especially the former of which had largely been ignored in recent decades. Tonetti stressed several times that, while prevention of dental caries and oral cancer has been very successful, periodontal disease has apparently lost ground.

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In a Nutshell

The November 2012 EFP and AAP workshop on systemic health and how it is affected by periodontal disease has resulted in the joint publication of a couple of valuable systematic reviews in both Journal of Clinical Periodontology and Journal of Periodontology. I have expressed my strong opinion here on this blog that, in essence, there was not so much new or surprising. That there is strong evidence for minor effects of periodontitis on, say, cardiovascular disease and that diabetes mellitus is affected by periodontal disease while it is a risk factor for gum disease itself has been known for decades. That, what organizers had claimed,  there is now a need for intervention studies to show that the risk for cardiovascular events may be reduced, has been questioned on this blog and elsewhere.

I have criticized the workshop’s Manifesto, a press release which reduced the somewhat difficult to digest information to a message for the public (and I include here in particular most of the dental profession whose members may not be able or willing to read through the pages of documents, be it but systematic reviews let alone the original cohort studies). I have also suggested a brief example (based on a gut feeling of a possible risk ratio) in which the most relevant ethical problem of not treating huge cohorts for periodontal disease was mentioned while probably a great number of patients with periodontitis had to be treated successfully (number needed to treat) in order to prevent a single cardiovascular event (if the effect was causal) which renders the whole exercise probably irrelevant.

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