Tagged: Wenche Borgnakke

New Updates On the Perio-Diabetes Link

Earlier this year, delegates of the European Federation of Periodontology (EFP) and the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) had met in Madrid for a joint workshop on an update of the Perio-Diabetes link. I had reported on the event and some key findings, quickly posted on the EFP web page, here.

Already on and after 24 August 2017, a Consensus Report by the two organizations was prematurely published, and quickly (temporarily) withdrawn, in the EFP’s Journal of Clinical Periodontology and the IDF’s Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice. I had managed to get a print-out of the not-yet edited (and later withdrawn) draft version published on the JCP Accepted Articles page and had noticed that most of the evidence presented was derived of yet-to-be published review articles based on the workshop proceedings.

The final version of the Consensus Report (Sanz et al. 2017, Early View Articles), including guidelines for patients and health professionals dealing with patients suffering from diabetes and periodontal disease, went online this week, but still references to review papers presented on the occasion of the workshop have a 2017 assignment and are not paginated which may make it more difficult for scientists and clinicians outside periodontology or dentistry to locate the final papers.

To be clear, when it comes to keeping our medical collegues, and in particular diabetologists, interested in the very long-known link between periodontitis and metabolic diseases, proving beneficial effects of periodontal treatment on diabetic control is crucial. All was fine as long as numerous published, small-scale, mostly single-center, and often poorly executed, trials apparently showed that thorough subgingival scaling in patients with both periodontitis and diabetes led to an about 0.4% reduction of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), at least after three or four months. As that would in effect spare an additional antidiabetic drug, diabetologists stayed interested. Although results in a few trials indicated that the effect was not long-lasting, i.e., no longer discernable after, say, six months.

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